Mar 25, 2009

Attention Dachshund Owners

Every now and again I have something of actual value to say. This is one of those rare occasions. This information is UBER important if you're an owner of a dachshund. This was put out by my Dachshund Club, the Gateway Lo-Downs. I hope it comes in handy if you ever have to deal with a back issue with your bean.

Back problems, most commonly Canine Intervertebral Disc Disease (IVDD), are pervasive in Dachshunds, occuring in approximately 1 in 4 Dachshunds worldwide. Dodger's List is an invaluable resource for Dachshund owners whose dogs are experiencing disc problems, from mild/moderate bulging and discomfort to total paralysis.

WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW IF YOUR DACHSHUND SUSTAINS A BACK INJURY

TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE. The difference between full recovery and no recovery in many acute back injuries is often the window of time in which the injury has been treated. If your dog has lost bladder or bowel control and/or is dragging his or her hind legs, it is crucial that your dog be seen by an orthopedic specialist as soon as possible, but the sooner the better. Within 12 hours, Deep Pain Sensation (DPS) can begin to diminish - once it is gone, it cannot be recovered.

Surgery is not the only option, although it is often the most effective way to prevent recurring problems. There is a wide array of conservative traditional and complementary holistic treatments that can assist in the healing of mild to moderate IVDD symptoms.

Dogs that are fully paralyzed can still live happy, fulfilling lives. If your dog has sustained a back injury and will not make a full recovery, euthanasia is not the only option. Most importantly, don't blame yourself! Sometimes, even with the most high-tech treatment, dogs do not recover full function of their legs, bowel or bladder. Many companies make carts to help paralyzed dogs achieve mobility, and it's not difficult to learn how to express a dog's bladder or bowels.

If you can't live with a paralyzed dog, consider turning the dog over to a rescue group before considering euthanasia. There are many families who are equipped to care for a special needs Dachshund and would be thrilled to welcome even a paralyzed dog into their homes. Dachshund Rescue of North America is just one of many Dachshund rescue groups that takes paralyzed Dachshunds.

Dodger's List has created a short and informative slideshow for the owners of dogs suffering from IVDD. Please take a moment to go through it even if you have not had any problems with your Dachshund's back - it could mean the difference between mobility and paralysis if your dog experiences an injury! Follow this link to view the slideshow (NOTE: You must click "Next" at the bottom of the screen to view the next slide in the series).

24 comments:

hans1791 said...

I would like to add a comment to help echo but also amplify weiner woman's statement. First of all we are currently going through a very difficult recover from back surgery on my almost 5 year old male dachshund named Martini, we call him Marti. Let me just say that the very first statement is indeed the most important. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE, when your Dachsie has a back issue of any kind!!!!!!!!! Get them to a vet immediately! Don't wait and think it will get better, take them right away! Things can get really bad really quick with a Dachshund's back and trust me you don't want that for you or them. Our ordeal started with a routine visit because Marti was yelping on occasion when he was picked up. We took him to the vet, they said from the x-ray, it was a slipped disc and that the anti-inflammatory and pain meds should suffice. Fast forward 1 and 1/2 and we are waiting for him to recover at Texas A&M small animal clinic. Hopefully if everything goes well we are only looking at a couple of weeks without him at home. I want to say that I am a very intutive owner and know when my dogs are not well. This thing comes on quick and if not taken care of quickly can cause irreperable damage to you Dachsie. My only counter point to this post is please be cautious about holistic or alternative treatments when it comes to back issues and Dachsies. I am not saying they can't work but if you delay it can cause you all kinds of heartache.

Shelly said...

Here is my dilemma - we got our 6 year old dachshund to the vet ASAP and had no choice but to go with the alternative v/s surgery. She is currently on steroids, pain medications and sedatives. If she is paralyzed, unable to move back legs or tail - why is she in so much pain when I have to move her to clean her up and put down new padding? She hasn't ate since Sunday in the a.m. and only drinking by force with a syringe. I am to take her back to vet tomorrow if no better and she is no better! If someone could please give me any advice, I would certainly appreciate it. Should I give her something or than water? If she stays paralyzed, which I am preparing myself for that - when will her mind come back? Its like she doesn't even know me :{

Kristi Veale said...

I'm so glad to see that surgery is not the only answer. My little Abbie was running yesterday and she just started crying and couldn't move her hind legs. I waited for about an hour to see if maybe it was a sprain and then called the vet. He was able to see her yesterday (Sunday). He did x-rays and gave her a steriod injection and sent her home with muscle relaxers and pregnisone. She still wasn't better today when we woke. I have looked into the scooters/wheelchairs they are a ton less then the surgery would be. I'm not sure what to do or where to turn or who to ask. I can't afford a ton that's why I was thinking a wheelchair. She was however able to hold her bladder all night and it just broke my heart to see her spread out with legs behind to go potty today. Any other suggestions or help would be so great!

Kristi Veale
vealefam_3@msn.com

krishnaaa...a necessary evill@@!!!! said...

i hav a 4 yr old daschund....he was very active n playful..1 day he ran out 2 play n injured himself somhow..his both hind legs r paralysed..i took him 2 a vet immediately..n he gave him some injections...dont kno which ones..i took him 2 the vet 4 days continuously n took injections 4 him....he has lost his bowel movements..the vet has advised 2 give him physiotherapy...but his condition doesnt seem 2 improve..its been 5 days now...i lov him more than nethin in dis wrld...i jus cant stop cryin thinkin abt him n hav no clue wat 2 do......some body pls gimme some valuable advise on how i shud go abt it.....thnx in advance....

Laura said...

My 4yr doxie was paralyzed suddenly after getting her yearly shots and vet said it was because disc disease (still don't believe this). The first 5 days were terrible pain then it went away. I have to express her bladder and got her a wheelchair but glad I didn't put her to sleep. After about a month of getting used to things it is just normal routine for me to express her, assist feeding her and putting her in her wheelchair daily to run with the other dogs. My 3 other dogs accept her just like she is and everything seems normal for her now. When I go out of town, I board her with a vet that caters to her special needs. Just dont make any rash decisions like I almost did because I am so glad I didn't listen to my vet when he suggested that he didn't think I could handle her care. It was rough at first but it is so worth all the trouble for the love she gives our family in return. Feel free to email me at lauramurzyn@yahoo.com for more info.

Sherri Linsenbigler said...

My 5 year old dachshund, Rudy, is in need of back surgery due to a disc pressing on a nerve. He was fine one day, and the next he could not walk. This all started on 12-29-10. He was seen by a specialist on 1-4-11 and the only way he will ever walk again is to have the surgery. My problem is that currenlty I don't have the funds for the surgery. I recently had knee surgery and was hospitalized with complications and all of my funds have been depleded. The estimated cost for the surgery is from $2500 to $3500. I have been online looking for sites that could offer help with the cost. It breaks my heart to see my Rudy not able to walk or run. If anyone can offer any suggestions regarding any associations that may be willing to help with the cost, please let me know. Feel free to email me at sharon.allen-linsenbigler@dss.sc.gov Thanks

Anonymous said...

Hello everyone! Please look into animal chiropractic. I am a doxie owner and animal chiropracator. My dog is 11 years old and doing great. We have had our troubles but if you keep them well adjusted from a puppy you should not have to deal with surgery or paralysis. Even if it has reached that point an animal chiropractor can still turn things around. Time is of the essence though. The faster you seeek treatment the better the results will be. You can find a certified animal chiropractor in your area on the AVCA(American Veterinary Chiropractic Association) website.

Anonymous said...

I have a 4 year old daushund who on Christmas eve was paralyzed in her hind legs due to a herniated disc. Since no one works on Christmas I had nothing to do but cage rest until the following Monday. Monday when we woke up, randomly she was walking. Not the greatest, but she was holding herself up and walking. The vet set to keep up with the cage rest so I have it is now 4 weeks later and she walks great but still a little wobbly. Just curious if that is normal and/or if I should keep her caged still? I let her out to potty and eat and she walks fine. She only gets wobbly when she makes tight turns. I was curious becasue she did go paralyzed in her hind legs on Christams day if this is just perminate damage. She is in no pain and just wants to get out and play. I am afraid to let her walk and play though because I see that she is still not a 100% any advice??? buddie.wilmot@gallatin.kyschools.us

James said...

My 2 year old female dachshund's back legs became completely paralyzed right around New Year's day this year. She was on steroids for two weeks and she had little or no bladder control. We discussed putting her to sleep or searching for a rescue source as my wife and I both work and didn't feel like we could commit the time and care that a special needs dog needed. The surgery did not seem like a good option for her according to our vet. We decided to put her on crate rest. For three weeks she was in her crate except to go out twice a day to go to the bathroom. We noticed that she began to have better bladder control and didn't mess her crate. She then seemed to move her rear legs from time to time. She is now actually walking, although slowly and in short bursts. It is obvious that her legs are weak and that she seems to have some discomfort from time to time, BUT she is getting better every day. She is and has been a little overweight and we are committed to feeding her only 1/2 cup of food per day per our vet's instructions. The point of my post is that sometimes these guys DO recover on their own, but I really feel like keeping her in the crate 24/7 allowed her to turn the corner. For those of you that feel like crate confinement is mean, consider the alternative. Remember also that dogs are actually much more comfortable and less anxious in a confined, small, cozy, place like a crate.

Anonymous said...

James.....
That's GREAT!! Our little wiener ruptured a disc a year ago. No feeling, no movement, no blader/bowel control at all. Our vet said she wouldn't benefit from surgery so we didn't have it done. She was on crate rest for 4 weeks. After 4 weeks the vet said she wasn't going to regain anything. We saw that she was still as happy as ever so we started doing our research for wheelchairs and the like. I started my own therapy for her and two weeks after that she was getting her back feet under her and "drunk" walking. Now a year later she has a "tipsy" walk and uses her legs about 70% of the time. She doesn't have control over her bowel or bladder but she is a happy active dog, she bosses her pitbull sister around all day. We are still getting her a wheelchair (walkin wheels) because she loves taking walks but her back end tires easily. I agree completely with you James, they CAN recover or lead a VERY happy life, sometimes happier than before they were injured bacause they get extra attn. Plus getting her to take pills now is a snap, she always got hers in a piece of hot dog and thinks the sound of a pill bottle means treat time.

Denise Atkisson said...

I am desparately seeking help. My 9 year old dapple developed a limp 12/7 late pm. Around noon the next day she was 'down'. Having experienced the same with her sister 5 years ago, we immediately took her to out clinic. She was in surgery within a few hours. The doc said he got everything cleaned up well, but now she remains paralyzed. Her bladder is easily expressed, but she has had no bowel activity. Vet says if she cannot evacuate her bowels she will need to euthanized. I CANNOT accept that. Why? People live paralyzed for decades. I have read about Weiner Wagons, hand expressing bladders & bowels. Can ANYONE advise me? My e-mail is datkiss@att.net. I will be forever in your debt.

Anonymous said...

My mini doxy Lucy appears to have a limp on back right hind leg. When compared to our other doxi, it is definitely protruding a small bit from her body. I reviewed all the symptoms of ivdd and she is not showing any signs and is in fact completely normal. Could this be a slipped disk, or maybe something else?

Anonymous said...

I'm devastated by my dog woodsy recent paralysis of both back legs Easter morning. He had the surgery within a few hours but by that time he had no pain sensation in back legs. 46 hours later he still has no feeling. I'm wondering what our chances are for him to recover. How hard is it to take care of a dog with no bladder control? I already have 2 children, a 2 year old and a 6 month old at home but I love this dog so much.

Unknown said...

Update for my Abby, she made a full recovery in less than a year. I only had to express her bowels for few months, did water therapy in our bathtub for a couple of months and now she is doing fine. I guess it was about 10 or 11 months total for her to be almost normal. She can't go upstairs but she can get downstairs easily and she can't jump...she can walk, run (though it is a drunken looking run) and go to the bathroom by herself. The vet told me she always be paralized....I took her back to show my miracle baby off. If you want more info, email me at lauramurzyn@yahoo.com. I have had many contact me and have many success stories to share.

Mike McCaffrey said...

Hey everyone,....i'm going through this for the 4th time with my dachsi girl Tillie. She is almost 6 years old and has had 4 back episodes in the last 2 years. She has been my miracle dog.The previous 3 times she recovered within a month. This latest episode (1/7/13) has been the longest for recovery. She was on her way to another fast recovery but has had a setback. Currently she has feeling in her feet and legs but no desire to try to stand or hold herself up on her own. She has been fighting a UTI (Urinary tract infection) so i'm hoping that's part of the problem. I'm looking to get her a cart or build one at this point.

Arielle F said...

Well Fri (2/15) morning, my 4 yr 16lb mini doxie was limping. Thought it was a sprain, while he did rest in the crate, he didn't' express pain (other than not being able to jump on to couch - yes yes, tisk tisk doxie owner. By Sat 7am he had no use of his hind legs. Took him to vet immediately, who did the toe nerve test and said there's still possibilty. We went from tail wag to no tail wag, little appetite even on prednizone for a day and half...but last night and today he is eating roasted chicken with being fed and some wet dog food and water (with skull cap herbal drops added to it). He has perked up since having eating/drinking but still in tons of pain and we are on 3rd day of pred. Dr says, longer it goes less likely he is to regain that back. I would like conservative methods just because i know rest can heal it along with the necessary meds. Just wondering how long everyone considers giving the meds...i'm so sad. We have 2 labs, a scottie and another doxie.Email arielle@blacklabstudio.com (subject DOXIE INFO pleasE). Thanks so anyone who has suggestions. And experiences to share.

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Anonymous said...

Maybe you can help us. My Doxie is 5 and hurt her back and won't move. Three vet trips and now we are told cage rest for a month or so with meds. We are so sad my daughter cries everyday. We just didn't know how fragile a doxie back could be. Any advise can help I don't have money for surgery. She looks like she is in pain.

Anonymous said...

CAGE REST, CAGE REST, CAGE REST !! Mine is 7 and just ruptured a disc or two. Doxies are NOT that fragile if you learn how to take care of them. 1/2 cup of food per day (THAT IS ALL) keeping their weight down, and plenty of time to heal. Going up and down stairs can be a problem. Your daughter has to understand that this will take up to six weeks OR MORE .....for all those nerves to heal. I deal with a dog that can't walk (hind legs) every day. She messes in her cage (she sleeps on a plastic covered pillow and a towel) every day. I remove her carefully when I am home and put her in a smaller kennel (just the bottom) so she feels like she's out of the cage. I use wipes to gently turn her over and clean her up. It's been almost two weeks and she is better, but she must still have continuous cage rest. I am willing to keep going as long as she still has 'deep pain' in her hind legs (i.e. she can still feel pain when I pinch her foot pads on her hind feet - she will turn automatically toward that pain). Good luck. This could be an important lesson for your daughter to learn patience and compassion.....because it's going to take plenty but hopefully both of our dogs will walk again.

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Anonymous said...

If you work 8 hour a day is it recommended to leave him alone in a cage or does he need supervision?
I'm desperate for help.

Anonymous said...

Such wonderful help here! Our 7 yr old Heidi is having a hard time. She is on meds, for rest and pain, also cage rest, for about a week now. She seems to be fine after rest, but when out to urinate and empty bowels she right back to where she was, with the back curved, extended and head hanging. She looks so helpless, scared and like she is hurting and does cry from time to time. Hopefully it just hasn't been enough time, but we will go see vet again tomorrow. It is so hard to watch a dog in pain and confusion. She has never had to stay in a crate for large amounts of time. I am so happy to come across this site, it gives hope and help:)

Anonymous said...

I wish I would have found this site before Thursday. Our beloved 8 year old guy got HDD and we had him on steroids. He seemed better but then went totally paralyzed. By the time we got him to the neurologist she said it was at best 50/50 but based on what we told her, it could be very minimal due to the severity. We thought about the cart, but it takes lots of time and effort and was not an option. I thought letting him go was the humane thing to do, although a grown many crying for 3 days has not helped. He loved life, running, jumping and all the things we told him not to do. He brought joy to us. Had I read this I would have held on to him for a few months and even done the surgery. The neurologist said he was in pain although he hid it. I hope this site helps someone else. I've cared for sick family members and our little guy was one as well. I feels like I gave up on him.

Anonymous said...

Our baby got up this morning totally paralyzed from the "waist" down. He actually doesn't belong to us, my nieces belong to him. They are three and five, and when we found the little guy the youngest had just started walking. He had never saw a baby before. : ) She'd fall and he would bark and bark. By the next day he was scratching and whining at their bedroom door if we tried to keep him out. The vet put him on pills, and said if he isn't better in a few days, we should consider putting him down. The entire family loves this dog. I am asking for prayers for our little guy. I wanted to share our story, and ask any believers out there to please pray for him. We don't have money for surgery, and it don't seem like it would be kind to keep him alive if he's in pain, or even if he can never run and play with the girls he loves so much. We need God in this. Thank you for listening, and thank you for your prayers

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